Child Nutrition

JOSEY CREW
DIR OF CHILD NUTRITION

The Child Nutrition Services Department has approximately with approximately 150 employees and serves 12,000 hot, nutritious lunches and breakfasts each day in 23 Hardin County Schools. The Department operates the National School Lunch Program, established when recruits entering WWII were found to be undernourished; the School Breakfast Program, created as part of the Child Nutrition Act of 1966; the Summer Meal Service Program; and After School Snacks.  The department also operates a large ala carte program and catering program with all profits going directly back to offset costs of the other programs.

We use a computerized cash system in our cafeterias. According to board policy, a child who has no money in their account and has no cash may charge a maximum of six days of meals. With our computerized system, any amount of money can be put on your child's account and can be used for lunch, breakfast or ala carte items.

School Lunch Program

The National School Lunch Program (NSLP) is a federally assisted meal program operating in more than 96,000 public and nonprofit private schools and residential child care institutions. It provides nutritionally balanced, low-cost or free lunches to nearly 27 million children each school day. The program was established under the National School Lunch Act, signed by President Harry Truman in 1946.

School lunches must meet Federal nutrition requirements, but decisions about what specific foods to serve and how they are prepared are made by local school food authorities. These guidelines require school lunches to average no more than 30 percent calories from fat and no more than 10 percent calories from saturated fat in a one-week period. In Addition, lunches must provide an average of one-third of the key nutrients (protein, Vitamins A and C, calcium, and iron) and calories recommended daily for children. All Hardin County lunches  menus meet or exceed the minimum lunch requirements.

Due to the Child Nutrition and WIC Reauthorization – The Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act (S.3307/P.L. 11-296), we are required to increase our paid meal category 10 cents annually. Details below:

 

Sec. 205. Equity in school lunch pricing

  • Effective SY beginning July 1, 2011, schools are required to charge students for paid meals at a price that is on average equal to the difference between free meal reimbursement and paid meal reimbursement; Schools that currently charge less are required to gradually increase their prices over time until they meet the requirement; Schools may choose to cover the difference in revenue with non-Federal funds instead of raising paid meal prices.

 

  • Establishes a maximum annual increase in the required paid increases of 10 cents annually, but allows schools to establish a higher increase at their discretion. 

 

 

Lunch:  

                Full price student:              $2.70

                *Reduced price student:    $0.40

                Adult meal prices:              $3.60

 

Breakfast:

                Full price student:            $0.00

                *Reduced price student:  $0.00

                Adult meal prices:            $2.35

   

                *Maximum allowed by federal law.

 

ENHANCED FOOD-BASED MENU PLANNING APPROACH-MEAL PATTERN FOR LUNCHES

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS OPTION FOR
FOOD COMPONENTS AND

FOOD ITEMS

AGES 1-2 PRESCHOOL GRADES

K-6

GRADES

7-12

GRADES

K-3

Milk (as a beverage) 6 fluid ounces 6 fluid ounces 8 fluid ounces 8 fluid ounces 8 fluid ounces
Meat or Meat Alternate (quantity of the edible portion as served):

 

Lean meat, poultry, or fish

 

Alternate protein products1

 

Cheese

 

Large egg

 

Cooked dry beans or peas

 

Peanut butter or other nut or seed butters

 

Yogurt, plain or flavored, unsweetened or sweetened

 

The following may be used to meet no more than 50% of the requirement and must be used in combination with any of the above:

Peanuts, soy nuts, tree nuts, or seeds, as listed in program guidance, or an equivalent quantity of any combination of the above meat/meat alternate (1 ounce of nuts/seeds equals 1 ounce of cooked lean meat, poultry or fish).

 

 

 

1 ounce

 

1 ounce

 

1 ounce

 

½

 

¼ cup

 

2 tablespoons

 

 

4 ounces or

½ cup

 

 

 

½ ounce

=50%

 

 

 

1½ ounces

 

1½ ounces

 

1½ ounces

 

¾

 

3/8 cup

 

3 tablespoons

 

 

6 ounces or

¾ cup

 

 

 

¾ ounce

=50%

 

 

 

2 ounces

 

2 ounces

 

2 ounces

 

1

 

½ cup

 

4 tablespoons

 

 

8 ounces or

1 cup

 

 

 

1 ounce

=50%

 

 

 

2 ounces

 

2 ounces

 

2 ounces

 

1

 

½ cup

 

4 tablespoons

 

 

8 ounces or

1 cup

 

 

 

1 ounce

=50%

 

 

 

1½ ounces

 

1½ ounces

 

1½ ounces

 

¾

 

3/8 cup

 

3 tablespoons

 

 

6 ounces or

¾ cup

 

 

 

¾ ounce

=50%

Vegetable or Fruit: 2 or more servings of vegetables, fruits or both ½ cup ½ cup ¾ cup plus an extra ½ cup over a week2 1 cup ¾ cup
Grains/Breads servings per week): Must be enriched or whole grain. A serving is a slice of bread or an equivalent serving of biscuits, rolls, etc., or ½ cup of cooked rice, macaroni, noodles, other pasta products or cereal grains 5 servings per week

minimum of ½ serving per day

8 servings per week

minimum of 1 serving per

day

12 servings per week–minimum of 1 serving per day3 15 servings per week2– minimum of 1 serving per day3 10 servings per week–minimum of 1 serving per day3

1 Can be a combination of protein and alternate protein products

2 For the purposes of this table, a week equals five days.

3 Up to one grains/breads serving per day may be a dessert.

The Enhanced Food Based Menu Planning Approach is designed to meet the nutritional standards set forth in program regulations.

All schools in the district implement offer-versus-serve in the lunch program.  In offer-vs-serve, students are allowed to refuse one or two of the food items that make up the five items required for a reimbursable meal. A student's decision to accept or refuse up to two of the five items does not affect the charge for a lunch. If fewer than three items are taken, the meal can only be counted as an ala carte meal and will not be counted for reimbursement.

School Breakfast Program

School meals are intended to "safeguard the health and well-being of the Nation's children." Participating schools must serve breakfasts that are consistent with the applicable recommendations of the most recent Dietary Guidelines for Americans including: eat a variety of foods; choose a diet with plenty of grain products, vegetables and fruits; choose a diet moderate in sugars and salt; and choose a diet with 30% or less of calories from fat and less than 10% of calories from saturated fat. Breakfasts must provide, on average over each school week, at least 1/4th of the daily Recommended Dietary Allowances for protein, iron, calcium, and vitamins A and C. Hardin County Child Nutrition Programs plan menus based on the enhanced food-based menu planning model.  Breakfast prices are $1.00 for full price and $0.30 for reduced-price meals county-wide.

ENHANCED FOOD-BASED MENU PLANNING APPROACH-MEAL PATTERN FOR BREAKFASTS

FOOD COMPONENTS AND FOOD ITEMS

REQUIRED FOR

OPTION FOR

  AGES 1-2 PRESCHOOL GRADES

K-12

GRADES

7-12

Milk (fluid) (as a beverage, on cereal or both) 4 fluid ounces 6 fluid ounces 8 fluid ounces 8 fluid ounces
JUICE/FRUIT/VEGETABLE: Fruit and/or vegetable; or full-strength fruit juice or vegetable juice ¼ cup ½ cup ½ cup ½ cup
SELECT ONE SERVING FROM EACH OF THE FOLLOWING COMPONENTS, TWO FROM ONE COMPONENT OR AN EQUIVALENT COMBINATION:

 

GRAINS/BREADS:

 

Whole-grain or enriched bread

 

Whole-grain or enriched biscuit, roll,

muffin, etc.

 

Whole-grain, enriched or fortified cereal

 

 

 

 

 

MEAT OR MEAT ALTERNATES:

 

Meat/poultry or fish

Alternate protein products1

 

Cheese

 

Large egg

 

Peanut butter or other nut or seed butters

 

Cooked dry beans and peas

 

Nuts and/or seeds (as listed in program guidance) 2

 

Yogurt, plain or flavored, unsweetened or sweetened

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

½ slice

 

½ serving

 

 

¼ cup or

1/3 ounce

 

 

 

 

 

 

½ ounce

 

½ ounce

 

½ ounce

 

½

 

1 tablespoon

 

2 tablespoons

 

½ ounce

 

 

2 ounces or

¼ cup

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

½ slice

 

½ serving

 

 

1/3 cup or

½ ounce

 

 

 

 

 

 

½ ounce

 

½ ounce

 

½ ounce

 

½

 

1 tablespoon

 

2 tablespoons

 

½ ounce

 

 

2 ounces or

¼ cup

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1 slice

 

1 serving

 

 

¾ cup or

1 ounce

 

 

 

 

 

 

1 ounce

 

1 ounce

 

1 ounce

 

½

 

2 tablespoons

 

4 tablespoons

 

1 ounce

 

 

4 ounces or

½ cup

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1 slice

 

1 serving

 

 

¾ cup or

1 ounce

plus an additional serving of one of the Grains/Breads above.

 

 

1 ounce

 

1 ounce

 

1 ounce

 

½

 

2 tablespoons

 

4 tablespoons

 

1 ounce

 

 

4 ounces or

½ cup


Summer Food Service Program

Just as learning does not end when school lets out, neither does a child's need for good nutrition. The Summer Food Service Program (SFSP) ) provides free, nutritious meals and snacks to help children in low-income areas get the nutrition they need to learn, play, and grow, throughout the summer months along with intersession periods when regular school is not in session.

Children 18 and younger may receive free meals and snacks through SFSP.  Meals and snacks are also available to persons with disabilities, over age 18, who participate in school programs for people who are mentally or physically disabled.

After School Snacks

After school snacks help ensure that children receive the nutrition they need to learn, play and grow. Organized, structured, and supervised programs that provide snacks allow children to think and behave better, and help them make the grade!

In order to be reimbursed, the snacks must contain at least two different components of the following four: a serving of fluid milk; a serving of meat or meat alternate; a serving of vegetable(s) or fruit(s) or full strength vegetable or fruit juice; a serving of whole grain or enriched bread or cereal.

A la Carte Programs

All schools offer some items for sale in addition to the regular meal programs.  Second helpings of entree items and desserts, including ice cream, are sold in the elementary schools.  Middle and high schools offer a wider selection of a la carte items and may vary on a daily basis.  A la carte items are priced individually.  Make sure that your children know what a la carte items they're permitted to buy and how often they can purchase them.  If you do not want your child to purchase ala carte items, purchase breakfast, or make charges, YOU MUST NOTIFY YOUR CHILD'S CAFETERIA MANAGER so an alert can be posted in the  computer

Children with meal charges are not allowed to purchase a la carte items.

Free & Reduced Priced Meals

Students may qualify for free or reduced-priced meals ($0.30 for breakfast/$0.40 for lunch) based on their parent's income. Applications are given to all students upon initial enrollment each year. Applications must be completed and returned to the Child Nutrition office for processing. All applicants will be notified by mail of their meal status. 

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